Fourth industrial revolution driving the sophistication of IEDs

The fourth industrial revolution (IR) has bought about cyber-physical systems that are changing the landscape of war between state and non-state actors. Smart robotics, autonomous vehicles, materials that are lighter and tougher mean that for the first time non-state adversaries Read More …

DHS S&T Labs Demo Portable Explosive Trace Detectors

Two laboratories under the Department of Homeland Security’s science and technology directorate are teaming up to test portable explosives trace detectors. Researchers from the Transportation Security Laboratory validated gaps with the detectors and have spoken with vendors and customers to Read More …

Army researcher invents detector for non-metallic bombs

An Army research physicist has invented a “High-Frequency Electromagnetic Induction instrument,” which detects low and non-metallic improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Dr. Benjamin Barrowes, from the U.S. Army’s Engineer Research and Development Center’s Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, invented the Read More …

U.S. Army is planning to test the effect of polymer additives on fuel exploded by impacts and projectiles, or by an IED

Scientists at Caltech have developed a new type of polymer that prevents fuel from misting during an explosion. The breakthrough could decrease the amount of damage caused by industrial accidents and terrorist attacks. Had the new polymers been added to Read More …

DHS S&T Seeks Partners for First Responder Technology R&D

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) invites industry, academia, laboratories, and the innovation community to submit white papers related to 12 first responder technology funding opportunities. The new Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) solicitation (BAA 18-02 Call 0001) will remain Read More …

Defense Department awards $1.4M to VCU professor to study process leading to explosions

The Department of Defense has awarded two grants totaling nearly $1.4 million to a Virginia Commonwealth University chemistry professor to study the initial steps of decomposition in “energetic molecules” that leads to explosions. Katharine Moore Tibbetts, Ph.D., an assistant professor Read More …